The Blacklist (season 2) – TV Show Review

This is the first television show I’ve reviewed the second season of. Soon enough it’ll be Daredevil too.

The Blacklist picks up where the first season left off, and answers many more questions to Elizabeth Keen’s (Megan Boone) past, and how that links to Raymond Reddington (James Spader), all while the latter, who is a fugitive on the FBI’s most wanted list, provides names to the Bureau on his so-called ‘Blacklist’, filled with off-the-grid criminals.

As with any show, it must be asked if the second season is better than the first, and in the case of The Blacklist, it’s yes and no. There’s a phase between around episodes seven and fourteen where the show saturates a little and at times feels like it’s dragging on, which I didn’t find at all in the first season. This one starts off well, and from episode fifteen to the finale, really kicks into gear, but I wish it hadn’t taken so much time to do so. I suppose it gets difficult to fill a twenty-two episode span, but considering that the story in this season is much more cast than the first, one would assume that it would have been easier.

But having said that, it should be noted that in its best parts, the show is greater than its first season, and much more suspenseful and intriguing. More things start to make sense.

Relationships between characters are handled well, and the situation that Elizabeth Keen is in is highlighted very well with these, with her selfishness, selflessness, love, hate and more contrasting emotions that indicate that her character is always on the verge of explosion.

So to end this review on a high note, I’ll leave it at that. Not a perfect show, and I’ll have to rate it less than I did the first season, but it’s certainly a really good piece of art.

On a scale where M is the lowest, and R is the highest possible rating, with the highlighted letter being the rating:

The Blacklist (season two): MIHIR

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